Dull, Shiny Things

syukapong:

room

jump-gate:

Venus Wars

mtg-realm:

GAMING - RPGs - DICE SHAMING

Posted by vensari to imgur -  I’ve seen more than my share of ‘Pet Shaming’ pics on the interwebz but this is the first time I’ve seen ‘Dice Shaming’ photos posted by frustrated gamers.  I like what I’m seeing …

thestripedwurf:

Sometimes Shina could use a back rub before heading to work. A friend is all too eager to supply such a service. Just his pants Couldnt hold out.
Shina…can be a horrible horrible tease

thestripedwurf:

Sometimes Shina could use a back rub before heading to work. A friend is all too eager to supply such a service. Just his pants Couldnt hold out.

Shina…can be a horrible horrible tease

robertge:

If you haven’t seen the amazing picture done for me, here’s the original. This was drawn by Gluepaw.

robertge:

If you haven’t seen the amazing picture done for me, here’s the original. This was drawn by Gluepaw.

k-eke:

We need more Starfox ! Falco and Wolf will join soon I hope =)

With Fox Mccloud the fox, Wolf O’donnell the wolf and Falco the bird :p !

No more Arwings, just dance -U-

Sauver le monde en dansant, j’ai déjà vu cela quelque part ^^.

supahsayainsonic2:

Guardians of the galaxy was freaking greathttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-B2zu3SOJU8

supahsayainsonic2:

Guardians of the galaxy was freaking great
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-B2zu3SOJU8

hotterleilani:

psinei:

snowyanna:

215-to-fit:

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.
My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.
My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.
My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.
My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.
My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.
My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.
The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

Fun story time. I loved to read. So much so, I was reading chapter books in kindergarden. I broke the record for reading points in elementary school. They actually had to start making up prizes for me. No one in the history of the school had ever read so many books in a year. Basically, my class liked me because I won those suckers pizza parties in my spare time.
In second grade, I had a teacher named Ms. Mobley who believed all children should be average. She flat out told my father that all children should make C’s, and should never strive for more than that.
Not only was she insane, she also would routinely spell things wrong for us to copy for our spelling tests. Later, when we spelled those words wrong on the test, she would mark us off. Yes, our own teacher was sabotaging us.
I should have been tested for gifted classes, but I was not. Why? Ms. Mobley didn’t believe in “gifted” children.
This teacher had tenure and could not be fired.
Never forget.
"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

Just going to touch on that last, bolded quote, because that’s what I really want to poke at for a moment.
As a teacher myself, I wholeheartedly agree that whatever school system and district the author graduated from is one of the (sadly, many) districts we vehemently want to improve and reform, since they are doing the most harm.
However, that is not, and has never been, the aim of the American school system. Hyperbole aside, there are many school districts across the US that do happen to “work” and foster a love of knowledge, lifelong learning, higher-order thinking skills, imagination, and the ilk. They are, sadly, not pervasive, but we do work our damndest (and, believe me, making sure such districts exist, let alone ~run~ despite multitudinous issues is another miracle in and of itself) to make it happen.
Also, for the millionth time, tenure alone is not why someone “cannot be fired.” Tenure just means the district has to inform you why you are being summarily fired, that is all. It is, and never has been, a guarantee for your job. It’s further hyperbole by the media and by administrators who want to excuse away why they didn’t let someone go. Guess what? If you work in an office, if you work in retail, if you work…anywhere, really, the politics are always the same. That district just covered up for one of their own and just blamed “tenure” on it. It happens more often than you think, especially when people can (and usually should) be fired.


Teach:
: to cause or help (someone) to learn about a subject by giving lessons
Educate:
:  to develop mentally, morally, or aesthetically.
Seems that maybe a lot of teachers simply need to consider themselves “educators”, and then perhaps it will get into their heads that the whole business of being a child is to develop mental, moral and artistic skills.

The funny thing is, however, that parents were thought to be the ones that could do this.

We couldn’t be more wrong.

The major issue is that a lot of “Education” Majors in universities vary in terms of quality. The ones I attended, from Day 1 of the first course, focused on the latter, about every aspect of children, their education, and what our actual goals were aside from “they need to know X, Y, and Z before the year is over.” Every course covered the pedagogical and philosophical ramifications of teaching the way that we do, different styles, and various approaches to make sure we were molding our potential future students to become the best they could be. And yes, we all scoffed at the chapters based on “moral education” because it always sounds awful from textbooks, but we had professors that really pointed out how it criss-crosses heavily into classroom management, punishments, how we carry ourselves and ho we expect our students to behave…everything.And in our district, oh boy, parental involvement differs all over the place. One of the reasons why I’m, shockingly, universally liked by students and teachers both is because I’m as sweet and as helpful as can be, but don’t you dare insult or threaten any other student in the classroom. They know it all too well, and I have enough facial expressions and body language to make sure they’re on their way to apologizing profusely before I even say a word otherwise. It’s quite a thing to have that happen at the high-school level, and it’s not solely out of fear or intimidation or anything of the ilk. It’s mostly because I will toss them right out of class, which is otherwise heaven to most students, but many of them will know how disappointed I am with them. But when they’re back by the end, or when I see them otherwise during the day, I always let them know, once again, why they were sent out, that we all make mistakes and have days like that, just apologize to the person they hurt and we’ll start over fresh in class tomorrow, no harm done, life happens, and that’s it.At least in my district, that works. And I can tell you right now that, as spectacularly as that works with my students, some of whom have no one at home who actually disciplines them and gets them thinking about their actions, it doesn’t apply everywhere. I know it already, since I have tried that approach elsewhere and, while definitely useful, it needs to be more modified to the students and their needs to truly work as effectively as it does here. But…that’s education. Constant personal re-evaluation of every aspect of what we do. And, sadly, most educational programs across the US don’t teach that. In fact, there are a staggering number of “accredited” programs that don’t include Student Teaching as a prereq for graduation, and others just have Student Teaching be a “every other day” approach, with the actual, guiding teacher doing most of the work. That doesn’t work at ALL. You have to be down there in the muck, experiencing every little aspect of running a classroom day-in and day-out for weeks on end to know what to do. It’s the most important step in any education program, especially since it’s that course more-often-than-not that has people quit, even at the very end of their education career, because it’s not for them. Instead, we get semi-untrained people with little experience heading up classrooms and, invariably, we have nightmare anecdotes like some of the ones that pepper this thread.
And, god help us all, there are still a few states and school districts out there that do not require being a certified teacher in order to actually teach in public or private school. I have no words for that (save for endless strings of expletives).Ooof…but I can wax philosophic about these things for days.

hotterleilani:

psinei:

snowyanna:

215-to-fit:

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.

My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.

My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.

My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.

My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.

My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.

My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.

The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

Fun story time. I loved to read. So much so, I was reading chapter books in kindergarden. I broke the record for reading points in elementary school. They actually had to start making up prizes for me. No one in the history of the school had ever read so many books in a year. Basically, my class liked me because I won those suckers pizza parties in my spare time.

In second grade, I had a teacher named Ms. Mobley who believed all children should be average. She flat out told my father that all children should make C’s, and should never strive for more than that.

Not only was she insane, she also would routinely spell things wrong for us to copy for our spelling tests. Later, when we spelled those words wrong on the test, she would mark us off. Yes, our own teacher was sabotaging us.

I should have been tested for gifted classes, but I was not. Why? Ms. Mobley didn’t believe in “gifted” children.

This teacher had tenure and could not be fired.

Never forget.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

Just going to touch on that last, bolded quote, because that’s what I really want to poke at for a moment.

As a teacher myself, I wholeheartedly agree that whatever school system and district the author graduated from is one of the (sadly, many) districts we vehemently want to improve and reform, since they are doing the most harm.

However, that is not, and has never been, the aim of the American school system. Hyperbole aside, there are many school districts across the US that do happen to “work” and foster a love of knowledge, lifelong learning, higher-order thinking skills, imagination, and the ilk. They are, sadly, not pervasive, but we do work our damndest (and, believe me, making sure such districts exist, let alone ~run~ despite multitudinous issues is another miracle in and of itself) to make it happen.

Also, for the millionth time, tenure alone is not why someone “cannot be fired.” Tenure just means the district has to inform you why you are being summarily fired, that is all. It is, and never has been, a guarantee for your job. It’s further hyperbole by the media and by administrators who want to excuse away why they didn’t let someone go. Guess what? If you work in an office, if you work in retail, if you work…anywhere, really, the politics are always the same. That district just covered up for one of their own and just blamed “tenure” on it. It happens more often than you think, especially when people can (and usually should) be fired.

Teach:

: to cause or help (someone) to learn about a subject by giving lessons

Educate:

:  to develop mentally, morally, or aesthetically.

Seems that maybe a lot of teachers simply need to consider themselves “educators”, and then perhaps it will get into their heads that the whole business of being a child is to develop mental, moral and artistic skills.
The funny thing is, however, that parents were thought to be the ones that could do this.
We couldn’t be more wrong.

The major issue is that a lot of “Education” Majors in universities vary in terms of quality. The ones I attended, from Day 1 of the first course, focused on the latter, about every aspect of children, their education, and what our actual goals were aside from “they need to know X, Y, and Z before the year is over.” Every course covered the pedagogical and philosophical ramifications of teaching the way that we do, different styles, and various approaches to make sure we were molding our potential future students to become the best they could be. And yes, we all scoffed at the chapters based on “moral education” because it always sounds awful from textbooks, but we had professors that really pointed out how it criss-crosses heavily into classroom management, punishments, how we carry ourselves and ho we expect our students to behave…everything.

And in our district, oh boy, parental involvement differs all over the place. One of the reasons why I’m, shockingly, universally liked by students and teachers both is because I’m as sweet and as helpful as can be, but don’t you dare insult or threaten any other student in the classroom. They know it all too well, and I have enough facial expressions and body language to make sure they’re on their way to apologizing profusely before I even say a word otherwise. It’s quite a thing to have that happen at the high-school level, and it’s not solely out of fear or intimidation or anything of the ilk. It’s mostly because I will toss them right out of class, which is otherwise heaven to most students, but many of them will know how disappointed I am with them. But when they’re back by the end, or when I see them otherwise during the day, I always let them know, once again, why they were sent out, that we all make mistakes and have days like that, just apologize to the person they hurt and we’ll start over fresh in class tomorrow, no harm done, life happens, and that’s it.

At least in my district, that works. And I can tell you right now that, as spectacularly as that works with my students, some of whom have no one at home who actually disciplines them and gets them thinking about their actions, it doesn’t apply everywhere. I know it already, since I have tried that approach elsewhere and, while definitely useful, it needs to be more modified to the students and their needs to truly work as effectively as it does here. But…that’s education. Constant personal re-evaluation of every aspect of what we do. And, sadly, most educational programs across the US don’t teach that. In fact, there are a staggering number of “accredited” programs that don’t include Student Teaching as a prereq for graduation, and others just have Student Teaching be a “every other day” approach, with the actual, guiding teacher doing most of the work. That doesn’t work at ALL. You have to be down there in the muck, experiencing every little aspect of running a classroom day-in and day-out for weeks on end to know what to do. It’s the most important step in any education program, especially since it’s that course more-often-than-not that has people quit, even at the very end of their education career, because it’s not for them. Instead, we get semi-untrained people with little experience heading up classrooms and, invariably, we have nightmare anecdotes like some of the ones that pepper this thread.

And, god help us all, there are still a few states and school districts out there that do not require being a certified teacher in order to actually teach in public or private school. I have no words for that (save for endless strings of expletives).

Ooof…but I can wax philosophic about these things for days.

Not too long ago in an art stream, I noticed you using a square with a cross in it to draw a face. Could you show us your face drawing method?

superamiuniverse:

It’s not a normal method I do but it’s A method.

image

Really, it doesnt matter how you go about it, The idea is to learn to draw basic 3d shapes (Cube, Sphere, Cone, Cylinder, Pyramids) and then construct using those shapes.

Best bet is to start really rough

The over time, begin "sculpting" the shape. and finally putting in the detail.